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Google buys a newspaper ad to promote online advertising

20 Aug 2012 |  Liz Jaques 

Google is running a series of print ads in a bid to demonstrate that online ads are more effective.

The Globe and Mail, along with its rival the National Post, contained the following ad, which asks: "You know who needs a haircut? People searching for a haircut."

A media reporter from The Globe and Mail, Steve Ladurantaye, tweeted the ad with the caption: "An ad for Google ads in today's Globe demonstrates the value of print ads, yes?"

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